Quick Chicken Skillet Meal

The forecast calls for a high of around 93 degrees Fahrenheit today in our area, so I definitely didn’t want to be standing over a hot stove for a long time to make lunch. Here’s what I did instead:

Melt six or seven tablespoons of Simply Ghee in a skillet over medium heat. Slice up three large pearl onions — I get mine from a Lancaster County organic farmer via Pure Sprouts — and separate them into rings. Place the rings in the skillet, give them a quick stir, lower the heat to medium-low, and cover the skillet.

While the onions are cooking, cut one pound of chicken breast into bite-sized pieces. Add them to the skillet and re-cover it, raising the heat just a bit. Simmer the chicken until it’s cooked all the way through, which you can check with a meat thermometer or by slicing the biggest piece in half.

While the chicken is simmering, wash and slice one package of shiitake mushrooms (3.5 ounces, about eight mushrooms). When the chicken is completely cooked, add the mushrooms to the skillet, leave the cover off, and raise the heat to medium-high. Cook the whole mixture together while stirring it. When the mushrooms have cooked nicely, remove everything (except the melted ghee) with a slotted spoon to a serving dish, mix in 1/2 cup of cashews, and cover the dish to keep it warm.

Add two tablespoons of cornstarch to the melted ghee and whisk it in over low heat. Add 3/4 cup of water and continue to whisk as you raise the heat to medium. Whisk until the sauce thickens, then add salt and pepper to taste, pour it over the chicken mixture, and serve the dish immediately.

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Quick Hot Cabbage

Do you have a head of red cabbage sitting around in your refrigerator? Try this quick side dish with eggs or any pork product.

Melt three tablespoons of butter in a skillet. Shake in a hearty shake of garlic powder and cook for about a minute over medium heat. Slice the cabbage into coleslaw-thin slices and add them to the skillet, along with a cup of apple cider vinegar and half a package of Made in Nature Organic Antioxidant Fusion Blend. Stir it all together, cover the skillet, and let it cook for about ten minutes. Feel free to season the mixture with salt and pepper — my family likes it without them — and serve it with sausage, pork chops, or poached eggs. Nutritious and delicious!

What to Do with Watercress

Watercress is a tasty little plant with almost spicy leaves reminiscent of arugula and thin, crunchy stems. We buy our watercress from Butter Valley, which sells hydroponically grown living greens. According to these guys, it is just packed full of nutrients, including vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B17, C, D, E, and K. I just love the fresh taste and the crunch on these late spring days!

You can make watercress sandwiches (like in The Wind in the Willows) by spreading a bit of cream cheese on bread (or toast) and then using the watercress as the filling. You can make a watercress soup as our friends here advise. As for me, I like it in a salad:

Chop watercress coarsely and put in large bowl. Chop fresh cilantro finely and toss in with the watercress. Remove the peels from a couple of oranges, split them into sections, and toss the sections in with the other ingredients. If you are able to eat nuts, add a handful of almonds (whole or slivered). Toss it all together and serve it with some balsamic vinegar on the side, so each person can season it to his own liking. My family loves this particular vinegar, sold in the pretty downtown area of our town as well as online. I highly recommend it as a way to encourage young children to eat greens. A splash of dark chocolate balsamic vinegar is enough to make butterhead lettuce, watercress, or any other fresh, leafy green quite appealing to the under-ten set. Happy crunching!