Sweet-and-sour chicken

This is very different from the sweet-and-sour chicken dish often served at Chinese restaurants. It’s light and nutritious!

Pour a few tablespoons of sesame oil (olive oil is a good substitute if you have a sesame allergy) into a large skillet and turn the stovetop heat to medium. Cut 1.5 pounds of chicken breast meat into small pieces, each about twice the size of a bite. Add the chicken to the skillet and pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees.

As the chicken is cooking, slice one small cabbage head very finely. After you have verified that the chicken pieces are cooked through, add the cabbage to the skillet and stir it all together. Add more sesame oil if it is getting too dry, and turn the heat to medium-low.

As the cabbage-chicken mixture cooks, use a wire whisk to mix together (in a large bowl) a good shake of sesame oil, a good shake of balsamic vinegar, a dash of salt, a dash of pepper, and one tablespoon of honey. When this sauce is well combined, turn off the stove heat and scrape the cabbage-chicken mixture into the large bowl. Toss the cabbage and chicken with the sauce until the sauce completely coats the chicken and cabbage. Then pour the contents of the bowl into a large Pyrex dish.

Place the Pyrex dish in the oven remove it when the contents have been heated through. Serve while hot. This dish reheats nicely.

Quick Hot Cabbage

Do you have a head of red cabbage sitting around in your refrigerator? Try this quick side dish with eggs or any pork product.

Melt three tablespoons of butter in a skillet. Shake in a hearty shake of garlic powder and cook for about a minute over medium heat. Slice the cabbage into coleslaw-thin slices and add them to the skillet, along with a cup of apple cider vinegar and half a package of Made in Nature Organic Antioxidant Fusion Blend. Stir it all together, cover the skillet, and let it cook for about ten minutes. Feel free to season the mixture with salt and pepper — my family likes it without them — and serve it with sausage, pork chops, or poached eggs. Nutritious and delicious!

Vaguely Asian Salad

I can’t claim to have any authentic Asian cuisine at my house, but I do like cabbage and scallions. Here is a quick salad featuring both.

Peel and dice six large carrots and put them in a bowl. Add a rinsed and shredded red cabbage, six diced scallions, one large head of watercress greens (cut into one-inch lengths), and a bunch of cilantro (cut even smaller).

Mix the dressing: one jar of Delouis mayo (imported from France, available on Amazon; expensive, but totally worth it, and SOY-FREE!!), one tablespoon of lime juice, one tablespoon of superfine sugar(you might have it around for making drinks), a shake of dried garlic, a shake of salt, a big shake of cayenne pepper, and a bit of olive oil to make it more runny. Use a whisk until it’s at the proper consistency, and serve it on the side of your awesome salad.

Cabbage, Collard Greens-Style

I owe this recipe to Dr. Daphne Miller’s excellent book, The Jungle Effect. This book describes Dr. Miller’s research into “cold spots” for various diseases around the world, including Cameroon, which is a “cold spot” for colon cancer.

I didn’t have any collard greens around the house today, but I did have a head of cabbage, so I cleaned it, cored it, cut it into sections, and separated the leaves to make this excellent recipe:

Bring the cabbage leaves to a boil in one cup of water in a saucepan. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 20 minutes. Remove the cabbage from the saucepan, pour the water into a bowl–you’ll use it later–and melt one tablespoon of lard in the saucepan. Put the cabbage back in the saucepan. Stir one tablespoon each of ground ginger, garlic powder, and cumin into the water you set aside, then pour the mixture over the cabbage. Toss the cabbage a bit to distribute the sauce and continue to saute it over fairly low heat until nearly all the liquid is gone. When it’s ready, sprinkle it with salt and lemon juice (to taste), toss it, and serve it.

Slightly more tender than collard greens, and seasoned scrumptiously! My five-year-old found it delightful.

Hot Stuff

I know, I know–it’s too hot to make soup–but this is one of the tastiest and most nutrient-dense soups you’ll ever eat. I modified the recipe slightly from one in Judy Converse’s amazing book, Special Needs Kids Eat Right.

Cut one pound of bacon into one-inch pieces. Cook the entire pound of bacon by frying it in a saucepan. Set the cooked bacon pieces aside on a paper towel-lined plate to drain. Peel and dice one pound of potatoes. Parboil the potatoes for five minutes in enough water to cover them, in a Dutch oven. After parboiling the potatoes, add the bacon, five diced shallots, one cabbage (cored and cut into chunks), and a generous sprinkle of sea salt and pepper to the Dutch oven. Add enough water or homemade chicken broth to the pot to cover all the ingredients, reduce the heat so that the stew simmers, and allow the stew to simmer for at least an hour. (I cover it so the water doesn’t evaporate too quickly, and I lift the lid periodically (with a potholder!) to stir the stew with a wooden spoon and add water, if necessary.

Serve with homemade bread (like the sourdough rye bread in Heidi Swanson’s book here, which I make with Bob’s Red Mill gluten-free flour instead).

Bacon!

Here’s a fun recipe to use up a head of cabbage you may have in your refrigerator. My five-year-old daughter will eat a few bites of my coleslaw, but she told me this dish was “super terrific,” so I’ll be making it again 🙂

Plan to be working in your kitchen for at least 90 minutes, and perhaps as long as two hours. This is a stew, so it’s a great dish for winter, but on any non-super-hot day, it works well.

Cut one pound of sliced bacon into 1.5-inch-long bits and fry it all in a skillet (with a bit of olive oil, if needed). Keep poking the bacon with a fork (or two) in order to cook it all thoroughly and evenly. Don’t let it get too crispy, but make sure it all gets cooked.

While the bacon is cooking, peel two pounds of potatoes and cut them into one-inch cubes. Put the potato cubes into a small pot, cover them with water, put the lid on, and heat the pot on high until it boils. Then cook the potatoes at a managed boil for five minutes. DO NOT DRAIN THE POTATOES.

Take a Dutch / French oven and sprinkle garlic salt (I love Himalasalt), pepper, and minced onions on the bottom. Wash a head of cabbage, peel off the grody outer leaves, core it, and cut the cabbage into small chunks. Place the cabbage chunks in the Dutch oven on top of the seasonings.

When the bacon and the potatoes are ready, put them (along with all of the potato water) into the Dutch oven, and add as much water (or homemade chicken broth–just boil the legs and wings in a soup pot for an hour the next time you roast a chicken) as you need to cover everything in the pot. Heat the pot over low (or, at most, medium-low) heat to a simmer, and keep it simmering for an hour, stirring periodically.

Serve with bread. (I like the Rye Sourdough recipe from Heidi Swanson’s Super Natural Every Day, although I make it with Bob’s Red Mill All-Purpose Gluten-Free Baking Flour.) Enjoy!